September 8 Biking in Shenzhen

It is still summer here in Longhua. It was 90 degrees F, and humid, but sunny on Sunday, so Jeff had a wonderful idea. He proposed that we go biking on the new bike trail that runs along part of the seacoast in Shenzhen. I thought that was a wonderful idea, as it would be less exhausting that trying to go hiking in humid, sticky weather. Also, there might be a bit of a breeze along the seacoast. So we set off on the subway to go into Shenzhen, to the part of the city that is south and west from Longhua. This is a long subway ride, about one hour, as it is almost as far from Longhua as you can get in Shenzhen.

Once we exited the closest subway stop to this part of Shenzhen’s seacoast, we still had a one  and a half mile walk to the seashore. Fortunately, we could walk this entire distance on the beautiful, flat, shaded streets in this part of the city. I often complain about “only in China” moments when I am writing about my experiences on this blog. But this is one case where an “only in China” idea really should be seriously copied elsewhere!

The photo below shows the Shenzhen street that we were walking along. To my left is a six lane highway, with three lanes of traffic for cars in each direction. There is a fence with an additional barrier of bushes separating the sidewalk from the apartment building on the right side, just out of the range of the photo. There are bushes separating the sidewalk from the fence, then more trees separating the nicely paved sidewalk from the bike path.

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Ann standing on a bike path along a street in Shenzhen.

There were more trees and landscaping separating the bike path from the six lane highway. This made the street cool and pleasant (from the tree shade) to walk along, and it also muffled the car noise. It likely also blocked off some of the car exhaust from reaching us. Most of the trees are fairly big when they are transplanted around here. Likely these trees have only been growing along this street for a few years.

I guess the “only in China” moment is what is missing from this photo. Do you see any bikes on the bike path? There weren’t many; most of them were still riding in the street, causing lots of honking as they dodged between cars and ignored the traffic lights.

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Jeff standing on a street in Shenzhen.

There was a nice pedestrian and bike bridge at the end of the street to cross the big coastal highway. This reminded me of the bridge near Harmony’s apartment in Taipei. It even had a shade awning!

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Ann standing in the center of the pedestrian and bike bridge across the major highway along the seacoast.

Next to the seacoast were some newer apartment buildings . Jeff took the photo below because he was amazed that they were all glass (even the balconies) on the side facing the ocean. I know the residents must appreciate that, but it made for a rather unattractive building.

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Glass apartment building along the seacoast Shenzhen.

Here is a photo of Jeff standing next to a map showing the bike trail along the seacoast in Shenzhen. He is holding onto the tandem bike that we rented. We decided to rent a tandem bike because we had never tried tandem biking before. Also, it was cheaper to rent one tandem bike than two regular bikes.

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Jeff standing next to a map of the Shenzhen seacoast bike trail.

Here is Jeff posing along a section of the bike trail. Behind him are some mangrove trees. There are lots of them that were planted along this section of the coastline by the Shenzhen government for flood control.

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Jeff on the bike trail, with mangrove trees behind him.

You can see the mountains of Hong Kong across the bay in the background of this photo. It was a relatively clear moderate pollution level day in Shenzhen. It it is still a bit hazy in this photo

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Looking across the bay towards the mountains of Hong Kong.

There were a lot of white herons in the mangrove trees.

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White heron in a mangrove tree.

The bike trail goes all the way to the Shenzhen Seacoast Mangrove Park at one end. I visited this park when I first came to Shenzhen five years ago.

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Jeff posing with the Shenzhen Seacoast Mangrove Park behind him.

Here is another photo of the park. The shore is actually large white rocks, not sand. It is definitely not a swimming beach! You can also see the buildings of Shenzhen in the background of this photo.

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Shenzhen Mangrove Seacoast Park

Here is a close up photo of the white rocks along the seashore, with some of the many area herons on them.

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White herons on the rocks along the seashore.

Here I am posing in front of a large rock monument along the bike path. I am not sure what it represents, but they seem to like to put up large rock monuments in Shenzhen. Behind it is a new stadium.

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Ann posing in front of a large rock monument along the bike path.

Here I am posing at the other end of the seacoast bike trail. I think that the trail ends here because they are still building it. The construction crane in the background of this photo is next to a bridge that looks like it will connect to the bike path someday.

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Ann posing at the other end of the Shenzhen seacoast bike trail.

This is the only photo of both of us on the tandem bike. One of the rental employees toke this photo for us when we returned the bike.

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Jeff and Ann on our tandem rental bike.

 

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