July 13 Kangleshan Trail

It was a beautiful, clear, summer morning, so Jeff and I decided to hike to the top of the Kangleshan trail to take photos of Dahu Park and Neihu. There is a photo spot on this trail that is the best place to get great photos. Many photographers come here to take photos.

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Photo of Dahu Park and Neihu taken from the photo spot at the top of the Kangleshan trail

Jeff was nervous about taking me, after what happened on Saturday at Lion’s Head Mountain, but I did okay. It was early in the morning, so cooler, and we hiked up slowly.

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View of Dahu Park, the subway, and Neihu from the Kangleshan photo spot

The actual top of this mountain does not have a view, the photo spot is a bit further along the trail.

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Jeff is standing on the top of Kangleshan Mountain in Neihu

This photo has a good view of our apartment building, and Taipei in the background. Our apartment building is the tall one on the right with the round dome on top. You can also see the iconic Grand Hyatt hotel in the background on the left. It is the building visible with the yellow roof.

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Photo of our apartment building, with Taipei in the background, taken at the Kangleshan photo spot

Here is a photo of the mountains looking in the opposite direction. I included this photo in the blog for papa, as it has a great view of the high power lines going over the mountains.

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Photo of the high power lines going over the mountains, taken from the Kangleshan photo spot

We took a trail down the mountain that we had not taken before. This trail was notable for the many small temples along the trail. The first temple that we came to was a large Tudigong temple built up around a smaller Tudigong shrine.

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Photo of a Tudigong temple along the Kangleshan trail

This photo was taken from the front of the temple.

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Front view of the Tudigong temple along the Kangleshan trail

This photo is taken looking inside of the temple. you can see the roof of the original small stone shrine in the back.

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Photo of the inside of the Tudigong temple along the Kangleshan trail

The next photo was taken of the inside of the small stone shrine.

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Original small stone Tudigong shrine inside of the bigger temple

I am sure there is an interesting story behind why they built a bigger temple around this Tudigong shrine. But there were no signs (with English) anywhere, and there was no attendant on duty at the temple. So all I can write about now is what we saw. The photo below is of one of the sculptures on the roof of the temple. I liked this figure, as it is the way I would visualize Tudigong appearing if he was in a human form.

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Roof sculpture on the top of the Tudigong temple along the Kangleshan trail

I took this photo because I thought that it was amusing that there were hula hoops for exercise on the shaded patio next to the temple. So you could hike up this trail and pay your respects to Tudigong, and then get some exercise before you hike back down.

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Hula hoops on the shaded patio next to the Tudigong temple

Finally, I took this last photo because I thought it was cute that there was a dog sleeping next to the stone lion guardian by the temple steps. Two “guardians”, neither one caring that we were there!

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Dog sleeping next to a stone lion guardian by the steps up to the Tudigong temple

We continued hiking down the trail, and soon came to the next temple. This was a temple dedicated to Matsu under a large tree. it was much smaller than the Tudigong temple.

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Jeff is standing in front of the Matsu temple under a large tree along the Kangleshan trail

The photo below shows a close up view of the inside of the Matsu temple. The statue of Matsu is behind bars. Do they really need to put in bars to keep people from taking the statues? Does poor Matsu feel like a prisoner?

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Matsu statue behind bars in the Matsu temple

It was not long before we came to another temple. I think that this one was also dedicated to Tudigong.

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Jeff is standing in front of another temple along the Kangleshan trail

The photo below shows a close up view of the inside of this temple. There were no bars in this one.

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Photo of the inside of the temple

And then we came to another small temple. At this point, we were down off the mountain, and walking back towards the city.

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Small temple on the edge of a parking lot at the bottom of the trail

This temple’s small shelf was filled to capacity, so some of the statues are on a folding table in front of it.

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Inside photo of the small temple beside the parking lot

I still want to go back and do some more hiking around Lion’s Head Mountain. But clearly if we want to hike around lower elevation mountain trails with lots of old, small temples, we don’t need to go all the way to the Tri-mountain area of Taiwan! There are trails like that right in our backyard in the Neihu mountains!

 

 

 

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